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The Ciannachta tribe are the main focus of Cath Crinna. The myth mightve been rewritten by Cormac mac Cuileann frim an earlier ulster story to show that his dynasty and not the Ui Neill were responsible for the Ciannachtas contemporary territories in ulster and leinster.

Cormac was constantly at war with the Ui Neill and he mightve wanted to woo the Ciannachta over to his side. So in Cath Crinna he has a mythological munster over king  rallying his sub tribes for a battle. The founder of the Ciannachta Teigue agrees to fight with the Eoghannacht because theyve a common ethnicity… and so theyre granted lands by the Eoghannacht. 

The narrative of myths is always fiction but this fiction presaged Cormac mac Cuilleanns death. He died in battle against the leinster Ui Neill and never managed to woo the Ciannachta.

In the end he started openly trashing Leinster and his dynasty went down in flames so badly the Dal gCais were the next munster tribe to challenge the high kingship. They were nobodies who took advantage of the power vaccuum Cormac left behind him.They grew into the Ui Briain dynasty under the uber famous Brian Boru.
Anonymous said: I noticed a while back you said the tuatha are myth, not folk. Are they the same as the faeries? And if not, which faeries are Irish folk trad? (Sometimes I get my Scottish faeries mixed up with my Irish ones). bedbdearg: irelandseyeonmyth: Hi! Thanks for asking :} As a yard stick fairies in ireland are only called fairies. Anything with a name is generally scottish. Theres exceptions but its a good way of telling at a glance. Banshee/bean si/female fairy - Irish. Brownie a name for a type of fairy - Scottish. With the idea that the tuatha de danann from myths becoming the fairies from todays folklore. I dont think it makes much sense. If people point to the tuatha de danann losing a fight to the milesians and going off to lice underground as proof… Thatd be centuries of cultural evolution accurately prophecied in one 8th century sentence. If the last 1500+ years of irish cultures was a series of books then fairies would be introduced in the last two books. The tuatha de danann would be at the middle of the series and theyd be retconned versions of characters from the start of the series. Itd all be by the same author fair enough but thered be a chronology to follow. That bit of the book of invasions might reflect the contrmporary belief that christs death banished all demons/deities leaving the earth free for humanity. The whole book of invasions is full of that stuff. Its famous for being “pseudo history”. Stuff msde up to fit Ireland into the propaganda of charlamagnes christendom. As a devotee of Irish myth, I am intrigued that a couple of real humans Cormac mac Art and Yeats …a thousand years apart both claimed to have met Aengus mac Og who actually warned Cormac against the war that cost him his kingship. And of all the fae that St. Patrick is reputed to have banished, he never attacked Aengus. And this is just me but I have often wondered if the Tuatha de Danann might have been Hittites after the fall of their capital. Just me. Ah youre a thinker fair play. I dont even know who the hittites were. Personally I dont think yeats thought he met Aengus, he was an occultist but he was a staunch protestant whose idea of a mystical experience was cartomancy or mediumship. And he moaned about experiencing those things once or twice in his life. How likely is he to have met a god? He was a romantacist poet like Byron and Id say he probably meant Aengus as a personification of the abstract concept of love. He was pleading with Aengus like he would the world asking it for love in his life. Probably Maude Gonnes love. He mooned over her for his whole life. If he hadn’t been an effite fop who wrote poems instead of reaching for what he wanted he mightve had a better life. Better than a rich guy who travelled n lived in luxury. Eventually going frim a vast landowner to becoming a member of a political class. Fker moped over everything. Ive got rented room and a wage packet and im happier than him.

Anonymous said: I noticed a while back you said the tuatha are myth, not folk. Are they the same as the faeries? And if not, which faeries are Irish folk trad? (Sometimes I get my Scottish faeries mixed up with my Irish ones).

bedbdearg:

irelandseyeonmyth:

Hi! Thanks for asking :}

As a yard stick fairies in ireland are only called fairies. Anything with a name is generally scottish.

Theres exceptions but its a good way of telling at a glance. Banshee/bean si/female fairy - Irish. Brownie a name for a type of fairy - Scottish.

With the idea that the tuatha de danann from myths becoming the fairies from todays folklore. I dont think it makes much sense.

If people point to the tuatha de danann losing a fight to the milesians and going off to lice underground as proof… Thatd be centuries of cultural evolution accurately prophecied in one 8th century sentence.

If the last 1500+ years of irish cultures was a series of books then fairies would be introduced in the last two books. The tuatha de danann would be at the middle of the series and theyd be retconned versions of characters from the start of the series. Itd all be by the same author fair enough but thered be a chronology to follow.

That bit of the book of invasions might reflect the contrmporary belief that christs death banished all demons/deities leaving the earth free for humanity.

The whole book of invasions is full of that stuff. Its famous for being “pseudo history”. Stuff msde up to fit Ireland into the propaganda of charlamagnes christendom.

As a devotee of Irish myth, I am intrigued that a couple of real humans Cormac mac Art and Yeats …a thousand years apart both claimed to have met Aengus mac Og who actually warned Cormac against the war that cost him his kingship. And of all the fae that St. Patrick is reputed to have banished, he never attacked Aengus. And this is just me but I have often wondered if the Tuatha de Danann might have been Hittites after the fall of their capital. Just me.

Ah youre a thinker fair play. I dont even know who the hittites were.

Personally I dont think yeats thought he met Aengus, he was an occultist but he was a staunch protestant whose idea of a mystical experience was cartomancy or mediumship. And he moaned about experiencing those things once or twice in his life. How likely is he to have met a god?

He was a romantacist poet like Byron and Id say he probably meant Aengus as a personification of the abstract concept of love. He was pleading with Aengus like he would the world asking it for love in his life. Probably Maude Gonnes love. He mooned over her for his whole life.

If he hadn’t been an effite fop who wrote poems instead of reaching for what he wanted he mightve had a better life.

Better than a rich guy who travelled n lived in luxury. Eventually going frim a vast landowner to becoming a member of a political class. Fker moped over everything.

Ive got rented room and a wage packet and im happier than him.

Anonymous said: I noticed a while back you said the tuatha are myth, not folk. Are they the same as the faeries? And if not, which faeries are Irish folk trad? (Sometimes I get my Scottish faeries mixed up with my Irish ones). Hi! Thanks for asking :} As a yard stick fairies in ireland are only called fairies. Anything with a name is generally scottish. Theres exceptions but its a good way of telling at a glance. Banshee/bean si/female fairy - Irish. Brownie a name for a type of fairy - Scottish. With the idea that the tuatha de danann from myths becoming the fairies from todays folklore. I dont think it makes much sense. If people point to the tuatha de danann losing a fight to the milesians and going off to lice underground as proof… Thatd be centuries of cultural evolution accurately prophecied in one 8th century sentence. If the last 1500+ years of irish cultures was a series of books then fairies would be introduced in the last two books. The tuatha de danann would be at the middle of the series and theyd be retconned versions of characters from the start of the series. Itd all be by the same author fair enough but thered be a chronology to follow. That bit of the book of invasions might reflect the contrmporary belief that christs death banished all demons/deities leaving the earth free for humanity. The whole book of invasions is full of that stuff. Its famous for being “pseudo history”. Stuff msde up to fit Ireland into the propaganda of charlamagnes christendom.

Anonymous said: I noticed a while back you said the tuatha are myth, not folk. Are they the same as the faeries? And if not, which faeries are Irish folk trad? (Sometimes I get my Scottish faeries mixed up with my Irish ones).

Hi! Thanks for asking :}

As a yard stick fairies in ireland are only called fairies. Anything with a name is generally scottish.

Theres exceptions but its a good way of telling at a glance. Banshee/bean si/female fairy - Irish. Brownie a name for a type of fairy - Scottish.

With the idea that the tuatha de danann from myths becoming the fairies from todays folklore. I dont think it makes much sense.

If people point to the tuatha de danann losing a fight to the milesians and going off to lice underground as proof… Thatd be centuries of cultural evolution accurately prophecied in one 8th century sentence.

If the last 1500+ years of irish cultures was a series of books then fairies would be introduced in the last two books. The tuatha de danann would be at the middle of the series and theyd be retconned versions of characters from the start of the series. Itd all be by the same author fair enough but thered be a chronology to follow.

That bit of the book of invasions might reflect the contrmporary belief that christs death banished all demons/deities leaving the earth free for humanity.

The whole book of invasions is full of that stuff. Its famous for being “pseudo history”. Stuff msde up to fit Ireland into the propaganda of charlamagnes christendom.